Abe Kazemzadeh, Sungbok Lee, Panayiotis Georgiou, and Shrikanth S. Narayanan. Emotion Twenty Questions: Toward a Crowd-Sourced Theory of Emotions. In Proceedings of Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, oct 2011.

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Abstract

This paper introduces a method for developing asocially-constructed theory of emotions that aims to reflect the aggregatedjudgments of ordinary people about emotion terms. EmotionTwenty Questions (EMO20Q) is a dialog-based game that is similar tothe familiar Twenty Questions game except that the object of guessingis the name for an emotion, rather than an arbitrary object. The game isimplemented as a dyadic computer chat application using the ExtensibleMessaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP).We describe the idea of a theorythat is socially-constructed by design, or crowd-sourced, as opposedto the de facto social construction of theories by the scientific community.This paper argues that such a subtle change in paradigm is usefulwhen studying natural usage of emotion words, which can mean differentthings to different people but still contain a shared, socially-definedmeaning that can be arrived at through conversational dialogs. The gameof EMO20Q provides a framework for demonstrating this shared meaningand, moreover, provides a standardized way for collecting the judgmentsof ordinary people. The paper offers preliminary results of EMO20Q pilotexperiments, showing that such a game is feasible and that it generatesa range of questions that can be used to describe emotions.

BibTeX Entry

@inproceedings{Kazemzadeh2011EmotionTwentyQuestions:Toward,
 abstract = {This paper introduces a method for developing a
socially-constructed theory of emotions that aims to reflect the aggregated
judgments of ordinary people about emotion terms. Emotion
Twenty Questions (EMO20Q) is a dialog-based game that is similar to
the familiar Twenty Questions game except that the object of guessing
is the name for an emotion, rather than an arbitrary object. The game is
implemented as a dyadic computer chat application using the Extensible
Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP).We describe the idea of a theory
that is socially-constructed by design, or crowd-sourced, as opposed
to the de facto social construction of theories by the scientific community.
This paper argues that such a subtle change in paradigm is useful
when studying natural usage of emotion words, which can mean different
things to different people but still contain a shared, socially-defined
meaning that can be arrived at through conversational dialogs. The game
of EMO20Q provides a framework for demonstrating this shared meaning
and, moreover, provides a standardized way for collecting the judgments
of ordinary people. The paper offers preliminary results of EMO20Q pilot
experiments, showing that such a game is feasible and that it generates
a range of questions that can be used to describe emotions.},
 author = {Kazemzadeh, Abe and Lee, Sungbok and Georgiou, Panayiotis and Narayanan, Shrikanth S.},
 booktitle = {Proceedings of  Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII), Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
 doi = {10.1007/978-3-642-24571-8_1},
 keyword = {dialog, dialog modeling, emotion theories, emotions, games},
 link = {http://sail.usc.edu/publications/files/kazemzadekh_icmi_2011.pdf},
 location = {Memphis, TN},
 month = {oct},
 title = {Emotion Twenty Questions: Toward a Crowd-Sourced Theory of Emotions},
 year = {2011}
}

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